PART 1 – INTERVIEW

You will be asked a series of questions related to your role in aviation, and then to

a specific aviation-related topic. There are no right or wrong answers – show you

understand the questions by responding to them directly and fully. The examiner

will ask you further questions, to encourage you to talk more about some of the

things you mention in your responses.

Listen to this candidate answering some questions about his role in aviation. 

These questions are always about you, and your relationship to aviation:

Now listen to the second part of Part 1, in which the candidate answers some

questions about the topic “Aviation Communication”.   This part of the test will

always ask you about some specific, routine aspect of your job or role in aviation,

and some non-routine aspects related to the topic.

PART 2 – INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATION

The new version of TEA, version 5.0, has changed significantly.

Watch the video below to see how Part 2 works.  There are notes included in the

video to explain each part.

PART ONE TIPS

1. Give full answers.  Try to show you can

connect ideas and explain your opinions.

2. Listen to the tense of the question. 

Should you answer in the past tense,

present tense or future tense?

3. If you do not understand the question, it

is much better to ask!  Do not give irrelevant

answers.

To recap:

There are 3 parts – 2A, 2B and 2C. In each part, you will listen to a series of

recordings of international speakers of English. Recordings will only be played

once unless you ask for repetition. You cannot hear recordings a third time. If

you need to listen again to check something you missed or didn’t understand

first time, please do ask for repetition. Be aware that regular repetition will

suggest that your Comprehension is slower and this may affect your

Comprehension score.

In Part 2A, you will hear 6 recordings in which a pilot or controller is talking in

a non-routine aviation situation. After each recording, you should show you

understand the situation fully by reporting your answers to 2 questions:  “what

was the message?”, and “who do you think was speaking, a pilot or a

controller?”. You will be given a Task Card to remind you of these 2 questions.

The examiner will ask you to “report what you can”. You should show that you

understood the situation by reporting it either in your own words or using the

words in the recording.  All the information in the situation is important.  This

includes stating what the message was and who was speaking (whether it was

a pilot or controller). If you do not give all of the information, it will affect your

score.

In Part 2B, you will hear 4 longer recordings in which a pilot or controller

describes a problem, says what they need, and gives some extra details. The

examiner will give you a pen for you to take notes on the Task Card. You need

to report the message as fully as possible - the more details you can provide,

the better. You should describe the problem, say what the speaker needs and

give any extra details that you can. If you do not give all of the information, it

will affect your score.

YOUR NOTES THAT YOU WRITE ON THE TASK CARD WILL NOT BE

ASSESSED OR READ, SO DO NOT WORRY ABOUT SPELLING OR

GRAMMAR.  THE TASK CARD IS WIPED CLEAN IMMEDIATELY AFTER

THE TEST.

In Part 2C, you will hear 3 short recordings in more general, non-routine

situations. After each recording, you have 20 seconds to ask the speaker

questions to find out more about the situation. Show you understand the

situation by asking as many relevant questions as you can. The examiner will

also ask you if you have any advice to give the speaker: again, show you

understand the situation by giving some relevant advice.

On the next page, you can challenge yourself with a simulation of Part 2. 

GUIDE FOR TEST-TAKERS

AND TEACHERS